The Silver Lining of Limitations

In Her Studio Stampington

Image featured on cover of In Her Studio, Spring 2019

“We all have challenges. We have to face them, embrace them, defy them, and conquer them.” – Victoria Arlen

Artists are no strangers to challenges.

It can be a challenge to make that first brushstroke on a blank canvas or that first stitch on a pristine piece of fabric. If trying to build a creative business, it can be a challenge to get your work out there to those who would appreciate it. And, of course, it can most definitely be a challenge to find a creative space where you can bring your imaginings to life.

As I was working on the Spring 2019 Issue of In Her Studio magazine, I happened upon a serendipitous coincidence: Two of the contributing artists share brilliant advice on the subject of limitations — and what is a limitation if not a challenge?

In Her Studio Stampington

Image featured in In Her Studio, Spring 2019

Allyson Rousseau (p. 22), who creates vibrant, contemporary weavings, shares this piece of wisdom: “Limitations can actually lead to better work and encourage more creativity, so start with what’s already at your disposal and grow gradually with your practice, whatever that may mean for you.” Allyson encourages artists who have a less than ideal studio situation that the space doesn’t actually matter — just start with what you have, and your creativity will carry you through.

In Her Studio Stampington

Image featured in In Her Studio, Spring 2019

The other artist who recognized the silver lining that comes with limitations is painter Carrie Schmitt (p. 40). Carrie was faced with a challenge when she couldn’t find an affordable studio space in her town, so her innovative solution was to go mobile and create Rosie the Art Bus. Carrie shares that “Rosie is a reminder that sometimes limitations can lead us to our most creative ideas and greatest blessings.” Without a challenge to make Carrie think outside the box, she would have never created Rosie, which has been a life-changing experience for her both personally and professionally.

Oftentimes when we encounter a challenge or feel that we have reached our limit, we don’t know how to move forward. What these women have realized is that limitations are just another opportunity to flex our creativity. Whether that means making the best of what you have to work with and improving it over time, or taking a leap into the unknown and trying something nontraditional, the important thing is that you are embracing, defying, and conquering … instead of stopping.

 

To the silver lining of limitations,

 

 

 

Amber Demien
Senior Managing Editor

For more inspiration on overcoming challenges, creatively, pick up the Spring 2019 edition of In Her Studio, on newsstands now or at: https://stampington.com/In-Her-Studio-Spring-2019

 

Amber Demien is the senior managing editor at Stampington & Company. She lives in Orange County, California, where she and her son are constantly covered in the fur of their many pets. 

 

 


Posted: Thursday, January 31st, 2019 @ 10:33 pm
Categories: Artful Living.
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Jordan Artful Living

In Her Studio Stampington

Image featured on cover of In Her Studio, Spring 2019

“We all have challenges. We have to face them, embrace them, defy them, and conquer them.” – Victoria Arlen

Artists are no strangers to challenges.

It can be a challenge to make that first brushstroke on a blank canvas or that first stitch on a pristine piece of fabric. If trying to build a creative business, it can be a challenge to get your work out there to those who would appreciate it. And, of course, it can most definitely be a challenge to find a creative space where you can bring your imaginings to life.

As I was working on the Spring 2019 Issue of In Her Studio magazine, I happened upon a serendipitous coincidence: Two of the contributing artists share brilliant advice on the subject of limitations — and what is a limitation if not a challenge?

In Her Studio Stampington

Image featured in In Her Studio, Spring 2019

Allyson Rousseau (p. 22), who creates vibrant, contemporary weavings, shares this piece of wisdom: “Limitations can actually lead to better work and encourage more creativity, so start with what’s already at your disposal and grow gradually with your practice, whatever that may mean for you.” Allyson encourages artists who have a less than ideal studio situation that the space doesn’t actually matter — just start with what you have, and your creativity will carry you through.

In Her Studio Stampington

Image featured in In Her Studio, Spring 2019

The other artist who recognized the silver lining that comes with limitations is painter Carrie Schmitt (p. 40). Carrie was faced with a challenge when she couldn’t find an affordable studio space in her town, so her innovative solution was to go mobile and create Rosie the Art Bus. Carrie shares that “Rosie is a reminder that sometimes limitations can lead us to our most creative ideas and greatest blessings.” Without a challenge to make Carrie think outside the box, she would have never created Rosie, which has been a life-changing experience for her both personally and professionally.

Oftentimes when we encounter a challenge or feel that we have reached our limit, we don’t know how to move forward. What these women have realized is that limitations are just another opportunity to flex our creativity. Whether that means making the best of what you have to work with and improving it over time, or taking a leap into the unknown and trying something nontraditional, the important thing is that you are embracing, defying, and conquering … instead of stopping.

 

To the silver lining of limitations,

 

 

 

Amber Demien
Senior Managing Editor

For more inspiration on overcoming challenges, creatively, pick up the Spring 2019 edition of In Her Studio, on newsstands now or at: https://stampington.com/In-Her-Studio-Spring-2019

 

Amber Demien is the senior managing editor at Stampington & Company. She lives in Orange County, California, where she and her son are constantly covered in the fur of their many pets.