Kintsukuroi-Style Art Journaling Project by Guest Artist Carolyn Dube

Please join us in welcoming guest artist Carolyn Dube to Somerset Place! Today, she’s sharing a peek inside her artistic journaling process to spark some new inspiration, including a quick video to give you a closer look!

What can you do when you have an art journal page that just feels blah?  Honor that! How? By ripping it up. Rip it to pieces. Yes, really rip it. And then put it back together, kintsukuroi style.

What is kintsukuroi? It is the Japanese art of mending broken pottery. The broken ceramics are repaired with gold, silver, or platinum. More importantly, kintsukuroi is all about honoring the journey. The philosophy is to recognize the history and journey of a piece and to allow the flaws to become a part of it.

Materials:

Process:

Take any art journal page you’re not in love with and rip it up. Paint the torn edges with metallic paint.

 

 

Reassemble and glue the torn page onto a new page. Add paint, color, and any other journaling techniques.

 

Stencil the focal image, the woman, with black paint and let dry. Paint her clothes with white paint. Then give it the extra sketchy look by loosely going over her with a Stabilo pencil.

 

Stencil the title using the fountain pen by tracing the letters then filling them in with loose lines.  Finish the letters by adding a darker edge with the Stabilo pencil.

Get a closer look inside Carolyn’s kintsukuroi-style journal with this quick video:

 

 

Carolyn Dube is a mixed-media art adventurer who takes the intimidation out of supplies so that you can find freedom through creativity, play with every color of the rainbow, and avoid rules whenever possible. She is a contributor to several Stampington & Company publications, such as Somerset Studio and Greencraft. You can find information about her designed stencils for StencilGirl Products, in-person and online workshops, and her message of O.O.P.S. through her YouTube videos and blog at aColorfulJourney.com

You might also be interested in…

 

 

Art Journaling Calls and Challenges

~Artwork by Carrie Todd

Art Journaling Magazine

In every 144-page issue of Art Journaling, artists open their journals and share creative techniques for capturing their emotions. From stamping and collage art to painting and sketching, each journal is filled with innovative techniques that you’ll want to try in your own art journal. Detailed photos and commentary will help you discover your journaling style, with hints and tricks for creating a stand-out page.


Posted: Tuesday, July 10th, 2018 @ 11:24 am
Categories: Art Journaling, How-To Project Tutorials, Mixed-Media Art, Uncategorized.
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One Response to “Kintsukuroi-Style Art Journaling Project by Guest Artist Carolyn Dube”

  1. […] that? It involves ripping up the page! Check it all out in my guest post on the guest post on the Stampington and Co. blog.  You bet there’s video too!  Thanks Stampington for inviting me to […]

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Jordan Art JournalingHow-To Project TutorialsMixed-Media ArtUncategorized

Please join us in welcoming guest artist Carolyn Dube to Somerset Place! Today, she’s sharing a peek inside her artistic journaling process to spark some new inspiration, including a quick video to give you a closer look!

What can you do when you have an art journal page that just feels blah?  Honor that! How? By ripping it up. Rip it to pieces. Yes, really rip it. And then put it back together, kintsukuroi style.

What is kintsukuroi? It is the Japanese art of mending broken pottery. The broken ceramics are repaired with gold, silver, or platinum. More importantly, kintsukuroi is all about honoring the journey. The philosophy is to recognize the history and journey of a piece and to allow the flaws to become a part of it.

Materials:

Process:

Take any art journal page you’re not in love with and rip it up. Paint the torn edges with metallic paint.

 

 

Reassemble and glue the torn page onto a new page. Add paint, color, and any other journaling techniques.

 

Stencil the focal image, the woman, with black paint and let dry. Paint her clothes with white paint. Then give it the extra sketchy look by loosely going over her with a Stabilo pencil.

 

Stencil the title using the fountain pen by tracing the letters then filling them in with loose lines.  Finish the letters by adding a darker edge with the Stabilo pencil.

Get a closer look inside Carolyn’s kintsukuroi-style journal with this quick video:

 

 

Carolyn Dube is a mixed-media art adventurer who takes the intimidation out of supplies so that you can find freedom through creativity, play with every color of the rainbow, and avoid rules whenever possible. She is a contributor to several Stampington & Company publications, such as Somerset Studio and Greencraft. You can find information about her designed stencils for StencilGirl Products, in-person and online workshops, and her message of O.O.P.S. through her YouTube videos and blog at aColorfulJourney.com

You might also be interested in…

 

 

Art Journaling Calls and Challenges

~Artwork by Carrie Todd

Art Journaling Magazine

In every 144-page issue of Art Journaling, artists open their journals and share creative techniques for capturing their emotions. From stamping and collage art to painting and sketching, each journal is filled with innovative techniques that you’ll want to try in your own art journal. Detailed photos and commentary will help you discover your journaling style, with hints and tricks for creating a stand-out page.