Add Dimension with this Resin-Layering Technique

Jewelry Resin-Layering Technique

Do you love the worn, painted look resin creates in a bezel?

This informative Jewelry Affaire article is on loan to show our Somerset Place readers a resin-layering technique that will add new dimension to your jewelry and mixed-media projects. We can’t wait to see what you make using this technique!

“Dreamy Layers” by Stephanie Gard Buss originally appeared in the Spring 2016 issue of Jewelry Affaire. Some images have been omitted to fit this space. If you enjoy this technique and are looking for more ways to jazz up your next jewelry project, we hope you’ll take a moment to check out Jewelry Affaire Magazine – an endless resource for jewelry makers, dabblers, and DIY-ers. Previous issues are also available, starting from $7.99.

 

I love creating miniature collages set in resin. I first learned the resin-layering technique during a class with Jen Cushman. In the second class I took with her, the Iced Enamel base added a whole new dimension to my jewelry. I love the worn, painted look it creates in the bezel. When you begin with a colored, textured base, everything comes together beautifully.

SUPPLIES
• Beads
• Bezels: large (Ranger – Ice Resin)
• Charms & ephemera
• Clasps
• Cord
• Embellishments
• Enamel medium: (Ranger – Iced Enamels)
• Enamel powder: (Ranger – Iced Enamels)
Glass glitter
Heat tool
• Measuring cups: small
• Mica powder: (Jacquard – Pearl EX)
• Paintbrushes: small
• Paper
• Photographs
• Plastic bags/Silicone mat
• Popsicle stick
• Resin: two-part, epoxy (Ranger – Ice Resin)
• Sari silk
• Sentiment: book text/computer-generated
• Toothpicks

TECHNIQUE
Decide what elements you want to use in your bezels; you can use charms, images, book text, words printed on tissue or clear plastic, or ephemera. Plan how you want to layer your embellishments. In the blue necklace, I used enamel powder to add color to metal butterfly charms before embedding them in resin. It’s helpful to lay everything out on a flat plastic garbage bag or silicone mat when pouring resin so you can easily pull it off. Because you need to mix a new batch of resin for each layer, it’s most efficient to make several bezels at once.

Mix a small amount of resin. Follow the manufacturer’s instructions to measure exactly, stir slowly and thoroughly, and then set aside.

Set each bezel and metal piece that you want to enamel on a piece of scratch paper. Use a separate sheet of paper for each color you want to use. Brush the enamel medium into the bezel wherever you want color and texture. Gently coat the area by shaking the enamel powder over the medium until it is well coated. Shake the excess powder onto the paper and pour it back into the can it came from. Repeat these steps with each bezel or metal piece.

Jewelry Affaire Article on Resin-Layering

Using a heat tool, carefully heat the piece until all powder has melted and looks shiny like paint, remove from heat, and allow the enamel to cool. When it is completely cool, brush a light coat of resin over the top to seal. Allow the bezels to cure for several hours until it is just tacky. If you choose to enamel metal charms, you can leave them unsealed, as they will be sealed within the resin.

Mix another batch of resin. Have a lot of baby wipes at the ready — this gets messy! While the resin on the inside of the bezel is still slightly sticky, place the first layer of images on the surface. Dip each piece of paper into the resin before placing it in the bezel (this helps you avoid bubbles later when you pour the layer of resin). When you are satisfied, pour the first layer of resin, carefully drizzling into the bezel with a Popsicle stick. Do not fill it all the way to the top. Lift any bubbles out of the resin with a toothpick or headpin. Allow the resin to cure overnight or longer.

Add the mica powder or glass glitter as an accent, which will appear to fl oat between the layers of resin. Add sentiments. Layer the piece with resin until you reach the top of the bezel. Be sure to allow each layer to cure at least overnight, and then the final coat should cure for three days. Be sure it is laying on a level surface, ideally on a plastic bag or silicone mat. Create the necklace portions for these pieces with waxed linen, glass, and stones.

TIPS
• Jen Cushman’s great tutorial on using enamels can be found at: youtube.com/watch?v=stZ0O_pupHY
• Plan ahead! If you have what you need within reach, you won’t risk knocking over your resin when you start digging for that one specific material.
• Put an empty bowl or plastic tub over the piece as the resin cures to protect it from bits of dust.
• Think outside the box for your collage. You can use natural materials like dried flowers, shells, twigs, etc.

 

Stephanie Gard Buss makes jewelry and sells her vintage beads in Oakdale, Minnesota, at The Vintage Bead Shop with her business partner, Jen. Her jewelry and beads are available at maxandlucie.etsy.com and thevintagebeadshop.etsy.com, respectively. Join the vintage fun on Facebook (thevintagebeadshop).

 

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Posted: Friday, April 14th, 2017 @ 9:00 am
Categories: How-To Project Tutorials, Jewelry Making, Mixed-Media Art, Uncategorized.
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Sarah How-To Project TutorialsJewelry MakingMixed-Media ArtUncategorized

Jewelry Resin-Layering Technique

Do you love the worn, painted look resin creates in a bezel?

This informative Jewelry Affaire article is on loan to show our Somerset Place readers a resin-layering technique that will add new dimension to your jewelry and mixed-media projects. We can’t wait to see what you make using this technique!

“Dreamy Layers” by Stephanie Gard Buss originally appeared in the Spring 2016 issue of Jewelry Affaire. Some images have been omitted to fit this space. If you enjoy this technique and are looking for more ways to jazz up your next jewelry project, we hope you’ll take a moment to check out Jewelry Affaire Magazine – an endless resource for jewelry makers, dabblers, and DIY-ers. Previous issues are also available, starting from $7.99.

 

I love creating miniature collages set in resin. I first learned the resin-layering technique during a class with Jen Cushman. In the second class I took with her, the Iced Enamel base added a whole new dimension to my jewelry. I love the worn, painted look it creates in the bezel. When you begin with a colored, textured base, everything comes together beautifully.

SUPPLIES
• Beads
• Bezels: large (Ranger – Ice Resin)
• Charms & ephemera
• Clasps
• Cord
• Embellishments
• Enamel medium: (Ranger – Iced Enamels)
• Enamel powder: (Ranger – Iced Enamels)
Glass glitter
Heat tool
• Measuring cups: small
• Mica powder: (Jacquard – Pearl EX)
• Paintbrushes: small
• Paper
• Photographs
• Plastic bags/Silicone mat
• Popsicle stick
• Resin: two-part, epoxy (Ranger – Ice Resin)
• Sari silk
• Sentiment: book text/computer-generated
• Toothpicks

TECHNIQUE
Decide what elements you want to use in your bezels; you can use charms, images, book text, words printed on tissue or clear plastic, or ephemera. Plan how you want to layer your embellishments. In the blue necklace, I used enamel powder to add color to metal butterfly charms before embedding them in resin. It’s helpful to lay everything out on a flat plastic garbage bag or silicone mat when pouring resin so you can easily pull it off. Because you need to mix a new batch of resin for each layer, it’s most efficient to make several bezels at once.

Mix a small amount of resin. Follow the manufacturer’s instructions to measure exactly, stir slowly and thoroughly, and then set aside.

Set each bezel and metal piece that you want to enamel on a piece of scratch paper. Use a separate sheet of paper for each color you want to use. Brush the enamel medium into the bezel wherever you want color and texture. Gently coat the area by shaking the enamel powder over the medium until it is well coated. Shake the excess powder onto the paper and pour it back into the can it came from. Repeat these steps with each bezel or metal piece.

Jewelry Affaire Article on Resin-Layering

Using a heat tool, carefully heat the piece until all powder has melted and looks shiny like paint, remove from heat, and allow the enamel to cool. When it is completely cool, brush a light coat of resin over the top to seal. Allow the bezels to cure for several hours until it is just tacky. If you choose to enamel metal charms, you can leave them unsealed, as they will be sealed within the resin.

Mix another batch of resin. Have a lot of baby wipes at the ready — this gets messy! While the resin on the inside of the bezel is still slightly sticky, place the first layer of images on the surface. Dip each piece of paper into the resin before placing it in the bezel (this helps you avoid bubbles later when you pour the layer of resin). When you are satisfied, pour the first layer of resin, carefully drizzling into the bezel with a Popsicle stick. Do not fill it all the way to the top. Lift any bubbles out of the resin with a toothpick or headpin. Allow the resin to cure overnight or longer.

Add the mica powder or glass glitter as an accent, which will appear to fl oat between the layers of resin. Add sentiments. Layer the piece with resin until you reach the top of the bezel. Be sure to allow each layer to cure at least overnight, and then the final coat should cure for three days. Be sure it is laying on a level surface, ideally on a plastic bag or silicone mat. Create the necklace portions for these pieces with waxed linen, glass, and stones.

TIPS
• Jen Cushman’s great tutorial on using enamels can be found at: youtube.com/watch?v=stZ0O_pupHY
• Plan ahead! If you have what you need within reach, you won’t risk knocking over your resin when you start digging for that one specific material.
• Put an empty bowl or plastic tub over the piece as the resin cures to protect it from bits of dust.
• Think outside the box for your collage. You can use natural materials like dried flowers, shells, twigs, etc.

 

Stephanie Gard Buss makes jewelry and sells her vintage beads in Oakdale, Minnesota, at The Vintage Bead Shop with her business partner, Jen. Her jewelry and beads are available at maxandlucie.etsy.com and thevintagebeadshop.etsy.com, respectively. Join the vintage fun on Facebook (thevintagebeadshop).

 

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