Artful Explorations: Dyeing with Avocado Pits

Artful Explorations: Dyeing with Avocado Pits We are thrilled to share an article from the revamped Somerset Studio here on the blog today! This issue is filled to the brim with new and inventive ideas to inspire your creativity. One of our favorite creative ideas included in the Spring 2019 issue is how to dye mixed-media art projects with avocado pits. Who would have known that they create such a gorgeous rosy color? See the article written by our editor, Christen Hammons, below.

Artful Explorations: Dyeing with Avocado Pits

 

Each time I’m working on an issue of Somerset Studio, I find techniques I want to try. Sometimes it’s something that yields really cool results, and other times it’s a process that just sounds really fun. So, when we were planning some of the new features to add to Somerset Studio, I figured it was time I stop saying I want to try some of these techniques, and actually try them. I’m thrilled to share with you, Artful Explorations, our newest department. Here, we’ll take one of the techniques shared in each issue, and try it out. We’ll then share our findings and thoughts about the process.

 

Artful Explorations: Dyeing with Avocado Pits

 

When I first received Lisa Malette’s article, featured on page 95, I had no idea what she had used to dye the fabric she used a beautiful pink color. When I learned that it was avocado pits, I knew right away I wanted to try this out. Not only is the color produced absolutely gorgeous and unexpected, as someone who loves avocado, I always have plenty of them on hand.

 

I needed to collect a few avocado pits before I was ready to dye anything, so over the course of a week, I gathered up the discarded pits. I scrubbed each one free of any remaining avocado, and then placed the pit in a plastic baggie and froze it. After a week I was ready to go.

 

What I Dyed

 

We have a nice stash of different paper and fabric scraps at the office, so I grabbed the following:

  • Copy paper
  • Grungy shipping tags
  • Cotton fabric
  • Seam binding
  • Cotton twill tape
  • Notepaper
  • Shipping tags
  • Vintage paper

 

Artful Explorations: Dyeing with Avocado Pits

 

My Process

 

I set out to following Lisa’s technique as closely as possible, but as I am prone to do, I changed up a few things.

First, I filled a small saucepan up with water and then placed four pits in the pan. Then, I brought the water to a boil, and then turned it down to simmer. I fully intended to simmer the pits for a couple hours, but I realized it was getting late and so after about 30 minutes, I turned the heat off.

Next I placed all the items I wanted to dye into a baking dish. Then I poured the dye over the items and discarded the pits. I let everything sit for about 30 minutes. When I pulled the items out, I noticed some of the papers were sticking together, which actually created really interesting areas without very much dye.

I placed everything on paper towels to dry overnight. When I woke up, the papers were still damp so I placed them in the oven on low for about 5 minutes. When I pulled everything out, I was absolutely delighted with how everything came out.

 

Artful Explorations: Dyeing with Avocado Pits

 

My Favorites

 

I really love how the lined notepaper, copy paper, and torn fabric came out.

 

 

Not So Favorites

 

The manila shipping tags and the grubby tags really didn’t take the dye at all.

 

Artful Explorations: Dyeing with Avocado Pits

 

Conclusion

This was so fun, and so easy! Like Lisa, I read a lot of versions of this where people used the skins as well to create the dye. I found that it wasn’t necessary at all. I have to imagine that the fabric isn’t washable, but I really just wanted to create a nice stash of trims and papers to use later, so I don’t need to wash anything.

 

Thinking of trying this? Be sure to use the hashtag #somersetmade so we can see your beautiful results!

 

Pick up this issue of Somerset Studio on newsstands or on our website!

 

Christen Hammons is the editor-in-chief of Somerset Studio. She lives in Orange, California, with her husband, two sassy cats, and one scruffy dog.

 

 


Posted: Friday, February 15th, 2019 @ 3:10 pm
Categories: Mixed-Media Art.
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5 Responses to “Artful Explorations: Dyeing with Avocado Pits”

  1. so fun and the color is gorgeous!
    I want to try it…

    Tamara :)

  2. Sharon Kettner says:

    I love these colors. I want to try this on a shirt or t-shirt. Does anyone think it will wash out?

    Thanks

  3. Lisa M says:

    This technique is so easy anyone can do it! It’s fun to experiment with lots of different materials. Just remember that man-made materials, such as polyester, won’t take the dye. My favorite results were Bristol paper and bleached muslin fabric.

  4. Jackie P Neal says:

    These turned out beautifully! Such a soft and muted pink- I am looking forward to giving this a go as well! Thanks for the inspiration!
    Jackie “)

  5. Darlene Henry says:

    What a beautiful color! I would love to try this. Now I just need someone to send me some avocado pits since I don’t eat avocados, he, he!

Leave a Reply

Jordan Mixed-Media Art

Artful Explorations: Dyeing with Avocado Pits We are thrilled to share an article from the revamped Somerset Studio here on the blog today! This issue is filled to the brim with new and inventive ideas to inspire your creativity. One of our favorite creative ideas included in the Spring 2019 issue is how to dye mixed-media art projects with avocado pits. Who would have known that they create such a gorgeous rosy color? See the article written by our editor, Christen Hammons, below.

Artful Explorations: Dyeing with Avocado Pits

 

Each time I’m working on an issue of Somerset Studio, I find techniques I want to try. Sometimes it’s something that yields really cool results, and other times it’s a process that just sounds really fun. So, when we were planning some of the new features to add to Somerset Studio, I figured it was time I stop saying I want to try some of these techniques, and actually try them. I’m thrilled to share with you, Artful Explorations, our newest department. Here, we’ll take one of the techniques shared in each issue, and try it out. We’ll then share our findings and thoughts about the process.

 

Artful Explorations: Dyeing with Avocado Pits

 

When I first received Lisa Malette’s article, featured on page 95, I had no idea what she had used to dye the fabric she used a beautiful pink color. When I learned that it was avocado pits, I knew right away I wanted to try this out. Not only is the color produced absolutely gorgeous and unexpected, as someone who loves avocado, I always have plenty of them on hand.

 

I needed to collect a few avocado pits before I was ready to dye anything, so over the course of a week, I gathered up the discarded pits. I scrubbed each one free of any remaining avocado, and then placed the pit in a plastic baggie and froze it. After a week I was ready to go.

 

What I Dyed

 

We have a nice stash of different paper and fabric scraps at the office, so I grabbed the following:

  • Copy paper
  • Grungy shipping tags
  • Cotton fabric
  • Seam binding
  • Cotton twill tape
  • Notepaper
  • Shipping tags
  • Vintage paper

 

Artful Explorations: Dyeing with Avocado Pits

 

My Process

 

I set out to following Lisa’s technique as closely as possible, but as I am prone to do, I changed up a few things.

First, I filled a small saucepan up with water and then placed four pits in the pan. Then, I brought the water to a boil, and then turned it down to simmer. I fully intended to simmer the pits for a couple hours, but I realized it was getting late and so after about 30 minutes, I turned the heat off.

Next I placed all the items I wanted to dye into a baking dish. Then I poured the dye over the items and discarded the pits. I let everything sit for about 30 minutes. When I pulled the items out, I noticed some of the papers were sticking together, which actually created really interesting areas without very much dye.

I placed everything on paper towels to dry overnight. When I woke up, the papers were still damp so I placed them in the oven on low for about 5 minutes. When I pulled everything out, I was absolutely delighted with how everything came out.

 

Artful Explorations: Dyeing with Avocado Pits

 

My Favorites

 

I really love how the lined notepaper, copy paper, and torn fabric came out.

 

 

Not So Favorites

 

The manila shipping tags and the grubby tags really didn’t take the dye at all.

 

Artful Explorations: Dyeing with Avocado Pits

 

Conclusion

This was so fun, and so easy! Like Lisa, I read a lot of versions of this where people used the skins as well to create the dye. I found that it wasn’t necessary at all. I have to imagine that the fabric isn’t washable, but I really just wanted to create a nice stash of trims and papers to use later, so I don’t need to wash anything.

 

Thinking of trying this? Be sure to use the hashtag #somersetmade so we can see your beautiful results!

 

Pick up this issue of Somerset Studio on newsstands or on our website!

 

Christen Hammons is the editor-in-chief of Somerset Studio. She lives in Orange, California, with her husband, two sassy cats, and one scruffy dog.