Red Stitched Card Project by Guest Artist Ella Wilson

Summer 2014 Sew Somerset



Today we are very fortunate to have the wonderful Ella Wilson with us. Ella has been featured in the pages of our Summer 2014 issue of Sew Somerset, Spring 2014 issue of Somerset Memories, and the Winter 2014 issue of Art Journaling. She has kindly agreed to create an exclusive tutorial for our blog readers, which showcases her unique blend of black-and-white photography and vibrant red thread. Ella captures a nearly palpable raw feeling of human connection in her artwork; it was that strong sense of emotion that made me seek her out as a guest artist after seeing and falling in love with her Simply Red Journal.

After spending some time getting to know Ella and learning more about her creative process, her family, and the significance of the red thread, I knew I just had to share what I discovered. Now that Ella has happily shared her techniques, I am curious to see how some of you would apply her bold stitching and image manipulation to your own art journal projects.

Summer 2014 Sew Somerset



“An invisible red thread connects those destined to meet, regardless of time, place, or circumstances. The thread may stretch or tangle, but never break.”  – Chinese Proverb

This quote, to me, is about love n’ kindness, and how we connect to one another.  Being a military spouse, I have lived in many locations and have been exposed to many cultures.  Moving around so much was difficult sometimes; I didn’t understand the language or the customs of my new neighbors. However, with respect, kindness, and a smile I found my way. I believe the red thread speaks of our humanity, our connection to others, and how we react and cope.

The photos I selected for my project share a sentiment of what makes us human— the joy of riding a bike, the celebration of a wedding, the homecoming of a loved one, the adventure of sightseeing through fresh eyes, or the simple delight of hugging a good friend. Have you ever met someone you instantly felt a connection with? I have, and I always feel as if fate played a hand in it.

If we just remain true to ourselves and follow our passions, then we’ll end up living the life we’re suppose to live. My father died while I was in college and I didn’t follow the career path I had wanted.  Somehow — through all of life’s difficulties, like losing my first child and becoming a Type 1 diabetic — I learned that I had to walk through dark clouds to become the person I was meant to be.

The love we feel for each other and humanity as a whole should never be severed. If it is, we won’t be human anymore. That’s what the red thread symbolizes to me, an unbreakable bond. Sometimes we need to be reminded to find joy, search for the people who understand us and love us no matter what.  It takes time, but as you walk through life’s tangled path, you will learn that it was all worth it.  All the people you meet along the way will help you discover who you are; in turn you will help them, too.  I make my journals and cards to remind others to look for passion, which lives in those precious colorful moments.  Sometimes artists get lost in their world of creating, but we have to live to create and we have to create to live.

REDTHREADARTSUPPLIES-064

Materials for Ella Wilson’s Red Stitched Cards:

-Blank Cards and Envelopes
-Red Thread or Twine
-Embroidery Needles
-Scissors
-Adhesive
-Toothpicks
-Fabric
-Embellishments
-Ink
-ColorBox Archival Dye-Wicked Black
-Red Wood Bingo Tiles
-Black and White Photographs
-Cardstock
-Red Fine Point Marker

Rubber Stamps:

-Pressed Profile Wood Mounted Stamp by Christine Adolph
-Tim Holtz: Slight Alterations Collection CMS
-Cavallini & Co. Mini Rubber Stamp Set – Mini Lowercase Alphabet

B11002

Ella Wilson’s Red Stitched Card Tutorial:

Step 1 - Take a blank card and stamp the background.  I started with black and when dry — I used red ink.  I made several cards at once.

Step 2 - Now, make copies of the photos on cardstock.  Cut out your images and attach the image to the card, with glue.  Dot the glue onto the corner of the image, smearing some towards middle-with a toothpick, in this case less is definitely better.

Step 3 - Now, stamp floral image between the girls using red ink.   I like the idea of growth as a symbol of their friendship.

Step 4 - While the glue dries, cut out fabric and select embellishments.

Step 5 - Gather wet n’ dry paper towels for the alphabet stamps. You’ll be stamping words onto your patches of fabric. I used words the word Kindred because it also has the word “red” in it. Kindred has two ds and because you’ll be using black and red ink, you’ll want to make sure you clean your stamp between uses.

Step 6 - Set stamped word aside, it’s time to sew!  I poked holes into the designated areas before stitching; it makes things a lot easier.

Step 7 - Use a medium embroidery needle, with 6 strands of thread, knot at both ends.  I connected the taller girl’s third eye to her friend’s hand. Leave a few inches of thread for later.

KINDREDkid017

Step 8 - Move your thread to the side and glue your piece of fabric onto your card.  Tie a charm onto the portion of the red thread that’s left hanging and make several knots at the end of it. I used a small golden key.

Step 9 – Stitch a little collar design onto one of the images.

Step 10 - Glue on the remaining embellishments, like your Red Wooden Bingo Tiles and let dry.

Step 11 - Use a red maker to highlight the ends of the key E.

There, you’re all done — we are all connected by our humanity.

 

Read About Ella Wilson in the Summer 2014 Issue of Sew Somerset

1SOM-SEW1402-Sew-Somerset-Summer-2014-175x175Thank you so much Ella for providing us with such a wonderful tutorial. To read more about Ella Wilson’s crafting style and mixed-media techniques be sure to pick up a copy of the Summer 2014 issue of Sew Somerset

 

To see more of Ella’s artwork and read more of her inspirational writing, visit her blog at: ellasedge.blogspot.com

 
 

Related Posts:


Posted: Thursday, June 26th, 2014 @ 6:15 pm
Categories: DIY, Guest Artist, How-To.
Tags: , , , , .
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9 Responses to “Red Stitched Card Project by Guest Artist Ella Wilson”

  1. We won’t be human anymore – you nailed it. It is the love that binds us. Remember the three things that remain, and the greatest of those is love.
    Ella is incredibly talented and bursting with ideas and wisdom. Thanks for featuring her here.

    • Gabriela says:

      Ella is a pleasure to work with. She is full of creative and poetic ideas that really hit home. We’re very proud and grateful to have been able to feature her.

  2. All the people you meet along the way will help you discover who you are; in turn you will help them, too. That is true, Ella. We don’t know how profound our impact on those we meet or how those people will affect us.

  3. Cat Kerr says:

    Truly wonderful Journal and I love love love the proverb,it stopped me in my tracks…amazing!

  4. Renee Zarate says:

    I saw this featured in the magazine but it is so much deeper than what I thought initially. I love Ella’s art work, it is really amazing how she blends the stamping and sewing together so “seamlessly”. Just makes me want more.

  5. I love the red thread art – especially the use of old vintage photos which are beautiful and so meaningful. Love the words written on the pages with the “red” in red thread, and the connecting lines. Looking at the closed book, I just long to open it and riffle through the pages. What a unique project it is. It would make such a meaningful gift for a friend or family member, to receive something like this. Wonderful work, Ella!

  6. Ella says:

    Alex-Thank you so much! It means so much to me you took the time to comment~ I won’t forget you when your next book comes out-my talented friend! ATB

    Gabriela-You were a pleasure to work with. Your insight and kindness will go far~ It was a gift-thank you so much for being so generous and real!
    I am very happy I had a chance to be part of this experience with you as my guide-thank you so much! @>——-(yes, it is red)

    L.Diane-Thank you so much! It has been great getting to know you~ Your insight has profoundly affected me! You are a wealthy of information~

    Cat-I love,love that you commented! It is a pretty special quote-thank you so much~

    Renee-You are so sweet! I love how you use color to brighten the world~ Thank you so much! We should do a collaboration!

  7. […] Combining vintage images, rubber stamp, embellishments and stitching in red Ella Wilson made a beautiful mixed media book full of cards. Find out more info and see more cards over on the Somerset Place blog. […]

Leave a Reply

Gabriela DIYGuest ArtistHow-To ,,,,

Summer 2014 Sew Somerset



Today we are very fortunate to have the wonderful Ella Wilson with us. Ella has been featured in the pages of our Summer 2014 issue of Sew Somerset, Spring 2014 issue of Somerset Memories, and the Winter 2014 issue of Art Journaling. She has kindly agreed to create an exclusive tutorial for our blog readers, which showcases her unique blend of black-and-white photography and vibrant red thread. Ella captures a nearly palpable raw feeling of human connection in her artwork; it was that strong sense of emotion that made me seek her out as a guest artist after seeing and falling in love with her Simply Red Journal.

After spending some time getting to know Ella and learning more about her creative process, her family, and the significance of the red thread, I knew I just had to share what I discovered. Now that Ella has happily shared her techniques, I am curious to see how some of you would apply her bold stitching and image manipulation to your own art journal projects.

Summer 2014 Sew Somerset



“An invisible red thread connects those destined to meet, regardless of time, place, or circumstances. The thread may stretch or tangle, but never break.”  – Chinese Proverb

This quote, to me, is about love n’ kindness, and how we connect to one another.  Being a military spouse, I have lived in many locations and have been exposed to many cultures.  Moving around so much was difficult sometimes; I didn’t understand the language or the customs of my new neighbors. However, with respect, kindness, and a smile I found my way. I believe the red thread speaks of our humanity, our connection to others, and how we react and cope.

The photos I selected for my project share a sentiment of what makes us human— the joy of riding a bike, the celebration of a wedding, the homecoming of a loved one, the adventure of sightseeing through fresh eyes, or the simple delight of hugging a good friend. Have you ever met someone you instantly felt a connection with? I have, and I always feel as if fate played a hand in it.

If we just remain true to ourselves and follow our passions, then we’ll end up living the life we’re suppose to live. My father died while I was in college and I didn’t follow the career path I had wanted.  Somehow — through all of life’s difficulties, like losing my first child and becoming a Type 1 diabetic — I learned that I had to walk through dark clouds to become the person I was meant to be.

The love we feel for each other and humanity as a whole should never be severed. If it is, we won’t be human anymore. That’s what the red thread symbolizes to me, an unbreakable bond. Sometimes we need to be reminded to find joy, search for the people who understand us and love us no matter what.  It takes time, but as you walk through life’s tangled path, you will learn that it was all worth it.  All the people you meet along the way will help you discover who you are; in turn you will help them, too.  I make my journals and cards to remind others to look for passion, which lives in those precious colorful moments.  Sometimes artists get lost in their world of creating, but we have to live to create and we have to create to live.

REDTHREADARTSUPPLIES-064

Materials for Ella Wilson’s Red Stitched Cards:

-Blank Cards and Envelopes
-Red Thread or Twine
-Embroidery Needles
-Scissors
-Adhesive
-Toothpicks
-Fabric
-Embellishments
-Ink
-ColorBox Archival Dye-Wicked Black
-Red Wood Bingo Tiles
-Black and White Photographs
-Cardstock
-Red Fine Point Marker

Rubber Stamps:

-Pressed Profile Wood Mounted Stamp by Christine Adolph
-Tim Holtz: Slight Alterations Collection CMS
-Cavallini & Co. Mini Rubber Stamp Set – Mini Lowercase Alphabet

B11002

Ella Wilson’s Red Stitched Card Tutorial:

Step 1 - Take a blank card and stamp the background.  I started with black and when dry — I used red ink.  I made several cards at once.

Step 2 - Now, make copies of the photos on cardstock.  Cut out your images and attach the image to the card, with glue.  Dot the glue onto the corner of the image, smearing some towards middle-with a toothpick, in this case less is definitely better.

Step 3 - Now, stamp floral image between the girls using red ink.   I like the idea of growth as a symbol of their friendship.

Step 4 - While the glue dries, cut out fabric and select embellishments.

Step 5 - Gather wet n’ dry paper towels for the alphabet stamps. You’ll be stamping words onto your patches of fabric. I used words the word Kindred because it also has the word “red” in it. Kindred has two ds and because you’ll be using black and red ink, you’ll want to make sure you clean your stamp between uses.

Step 6 - Set stamped word aside, it’s time to sew!  I poked holes into the designated areas before stitching; it makes things a lot easier.

Step 7 - Use a medium embroidery needle, with 6 strands of thread, knot at both ends.  I connected the taller girl’s third eye to her friend’s hand. Leave a few inches of thread for later.

KINDREDkid017

Step 8 - Move your thread to the side and glue your piece of fabric onto your card.  Tie a charm onto the portion of the red thread that’s left hanging and make several knots at the end of it. I used a small golden key.

Step 9 – Stitch a little collar design onto one of the images.

Step 10 - Glue on the remaining embellishments, like your Red Wooden Bingo Tiles and let dry.

Step 11 - Use a red maker to highlight the ends of the key E.

There, you’re all done — we are all connected by our humanity.

 

Read About Ella Wilson in the Summer 2014 Issue of Sew Somerset

1SOM-SEW1402-Sew-Somerset-Summer-2014-175x175Thank you so much Ella for providing us with such a wonderful tutorial. To read more about Ella Wilson’s crafting style and mixed-media techniques be sure to pick up a copy of the Summer 2014 issue of Sew Somerset

 

To see more of Ella’s artwork and read more of her inspirational writing, visit her blog at: ellasedge.blogspot.com

 
 

Related Posts: