Upcycled Cardboard Journal with Guest Artist Michelle Ward

We have a very special guest artist today! Please join me in welcoming to our blog the incredibly talented Michelle Ward. A gifted instructor, rubber stamp and stencil designer, and a regular contributor to our publications, Michelle has graciously agreed to give us a personal step-by-step tutorial on how to recreate the stunning Debries Journal that was featured in our May/June 2014 Issue of Somerset Studio.

~*~

An afternoon with a box from Amazon can become a cool journal.  With minimal supplies and no special skills, an ordinary cardboard carton is easily transformed into a unique book following the steps illustrated here.  I love upcycling the non-precious material, as its properties allow for interesting deconstruction experiments that can’t be performed on any other surface.  If you don’t have access to the packaging tape shown, you could adhere tyvek strips cut from a repurposed envelope, or try a similar heavy-duty tape.

 

MKW Cardboard Journal Tutorial 1

 

Materials for Michelle Ward’s Debris Journal:

Cutting Mat
Paint Paint Brush
Utility Knife Black Pen
Metal Edge Ruler
Stencils and Stamps
Cardboard Box Cut Down into 5 x 10” Panels (10 pieces, or size + quantity as desired)
Pre-Gummed Kraft Packaging Tape (I found mine at Staples)

 

Michelle Ward’s Step-by-Step Instructions:

  1. Cut tape into 10” lengths, fold in half with gummed side on the exterior.
  2. With water & brush, wet one half of the folded tape to activate the adhesive.
  3. Place tape onto panel, aligning fold with vertical edge.
  4. Fold over remaining tape, wet with brush, and place a second panel on top.
  5. Before completely dry, be sure the two panels can open flat.
  6. Continue adding panels by applying tape along interior gutters. Check for consistent and even alignment.
  7. Complete binding should resemble a stack of cardboard.
  8. Your cardboard journal is now ready for adding personal content, or better yet – DeConstructing!

 

MKW Cardboard Journal Tutorial 2

 

Michelle Ward’s Step-by-Step Instructions for DeConstructing Your Debris Journal

  1. Using a wood skewer (or an awl), insert into channels of corrugation to separate the kraft lamination.
  2. Tear away portions of the surface for random deconstruction.
  3. Make marks in the surface with pattern tracing wheel or awl. Cut and peel away surface to enhance your markings.
  4. Carefully cut away a portion and re-apply as a collage element.
  5. Further enhance your markings with additions of stencils and black pen.
  6. Apply cut-out as a collage layer. Draw in repeating shapes and enhance with piercing.
  7. Consider other options for creating marks on the surface before you begin applying paint, collage or journaling.

 

~*~

Read About Michelle Ward in the May/June 2014 Issue of Somerset Studio

May/June 2014 Somerset StudioThank you Michelle Ward for the amazing tutorial! To read more about Michelle’s Debris Journals pick up a copy of the May/June 2014 issue of Somerset Studio.
 

To see more of Michelle’s work, and to see where she is teaching, visit her blog at: www.MichelleWard.typepad.com
 
To see her full line of rubber stamps, stencils, and stencil/mask sets,
visit her website: www.GreenPepperPress.com

 

 

Related Products:

Stencil Girl Quatrefoil Stencil by Michelle WardAdvantus Tim Holtz Idea-ology Small FolioRanger Ink Dina Wakley Media Mask - LeavesFaber-Castell - Mix and Match Pitt Artist Pen Set EssentialStencil Girl Maltese Stencil by Michelle Ward

 

Related Posts:


Posted: Thursday, May 29th, 2014 @ 12:04 pm
Categories: DIY, Guest Artist, How-To.
Tags: , , , , , , .
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28 Responses to “Upcycled Cardboard Journal with Guest Artist Michelle Ward”

  1. I love love love this idea. Thanks for sharing. This will be a great project for my upper elementary art students to try next year. I love that you can incorporate sculpture, bookmaking, painting and collage all in this project. Awesome! I would love to see more of her finished cardboard journals.

  2. Seth says:

    I have seen Michelle’s journals in person and they are incredible. So much appreciation to Somerset and Michelle for sharing this tutorial on the blog.

  3. Kathlene says:

    This would be really cool for a school project.

  4. Sheila says:

    Cool! The binding method is so clever, and I love the look of black on kraft.

  5. lauree says:

    i think of this as a family project to do on a rainy day. or a group of adults could make something meaningful to share with a friend who is moving away…i realize it is put together first in this example but i like the idea of marking a place to leave clear then taping them together. some embellishment could be put on the tape after the book is made.

  6. Just love this, not only a good school project but also for a Nana to do for her grand kids, love it!

  7. Rosie Balderston-Denbo says:

    What a fun project need to go look but I think I have the supplies to make this Thanks

  8. Ella says:

    Michelle is a green diva! Brilliance dazzles in this project~

  9. Karen says:

    LOVE THIS!!! Such a wonderful idea would like to see more.

  10. What a beautiful piece of creativity!! Can`t wait to try this. Thankyou so much for sharing.

  11. Fantastic idea–thanks so much.

  12. Lisa M says:

    This was my favorite project in the latest Somerset. I love corrugated for its wide availability and have used it often for structure and decoration. Michelle has given me so many amazing new ideas!

  13. This is great!! I love Michelle Ward and I love the idea of construction and deconstruction in the same project. Awesome!!!

  14. I’ve had the great pleasure of taking Michelle’s classes in person and really appreciate this generous tute. Will pin for future reference… thanks!

  15. CathSheard says:

    Michelle this is such a cool tutorial. Living on the other side of the planet I’m never likely to get to one of your classes, but love your work. I am going to try this once I find some gummed tape. Thank you for sharing.

  16. Linda Warlyn says:

    Remarkable recycling! I have always loved the tawny organic hue of cardboard and Michelle has elevated this humble material to dizzying heights. This is a fabulous project for all ages and for THE ages. BRAVO!

  17. Thank you very much Michelle for this tutorial. The morning I saw the link to it I gave it a try. I gathered my supplies, I took on my headphones to listen to good music and I followed the steps! Took me about one hour or one and a half and the base of the journal was done. In the afternoon I started to deconstruct. I am not finished yet but I had a lot of fun that day and now 4 of my art friends want to come over and make the journal wirth me!
    Thank you Michlle for that!

  18. Pattyb says:

    Thank you so much for sharing! loved this journal!

  19. Vicki says:

    This is a terrific project! Thanks for sharing. I’ll be using this for my Summer Reading Program. Question: what is the width of the tape you used here?

  20. MV says:

    Thanks, Michelle, for the FABULOUS tutorial!
    I love your creativity!

  21. Chris says:

    It is a major treat to see Michelle’s tutorial! She is a genius at repurposing and I am so in love with cardboard! This is on my list for weekend creativity. Thank you for making this available, Michelle!

  22. LOVE all of this – definitely want to try! :)

  23. Mary Tyson says:

    Can’t wait to try this .

  24. iHanna says:

    Isn’t cardboard the pretties color ever? I so love Michelle’s style and journaling on a theme ideas! Thanks for sharing!

Leave a Reply

Gabriela DIYGuest ArtistHow-To ,,,,,,

We have a very special guest artist today! Please join me in welcoming to our blog the incredibly talented Michelle Ward. A gifted instructor, rubber stamp and stencil designer, and a regular contributor to our publications, Michelle has graciously agreed to give us a personal step-by-step tutorial on how to recreate the stunning Debries Journal that was featured in our May/June 2014 Issue of Somerset Studio.

~*~

An afternoon with a box from Amazon can become a cool journal.  With minimal supplies and no special skills, an ordinary cardboard carton is easily transformed into a unique book following the steps illustrated here.  I love upcycling the non-precious material, as its properties allow for interesting deconstruction experiments that can’t be performed on any other surface.  If you don’t have access to the packaging tape shown, you could adhere tyvek strips cut from a repurposed envelope, or try a similar heavy-duty tape.

 

MKW Cardboard Journal Tutorial 1

 

Materials for Michelle Ward’s Debris Journal:

Cutting Mat
Paint Paint Brush
Utility Knife Black Pen
Metal Edge Ruler
Stencils and Stamps
Cardboard Box Cut Down into 5 x 10” Panels (10 pieces, or size + quantity as desired)
Pre-Gummed Kraft Packaging Tape (I found mine at Staples)

 

Michelle Ward’s Step-by-Step Instructions:

  1. Cut tape into 10” lengths, fold in half with gummed side on the exterior.
  2. With water & brush, wet one half of the folded tape to activate the adhesive.
  3. Place tape onto panel, aligning fold with vertical edge.
  4. Fold over remaining tape, wet with brush, and place a second panel on top.
  5. Before completely dry, be sure the two panels can open flat.
  6. Continue adding panels by applying tape along interior gutters. Check for consistent and even alignment.
  7. Complete binding should resemble a stack of cardboard.
  8. Your cardboard journal is now ready for adding personal content, or better yet – DeConstructing!

 

MKW Cardboard Journal Tutorial 2

 

Michelle Ward’s Step-by-Step Instructions for DeConstructing Your Debris Journal

  1. Using a wood skewer (or an awl), insert into channels of corrugation to separate the kraft lamination.
  2. Tear away portions of the surface for random deconstruction.
  3. Make marks in the surface with pattern tracing wheel or awl. Cut and peel away surface to enhance your markings.
  4. Carefully cut away a portion and re-apply as a collage element.
  5. Further enhance your markings with additions of stencils and black pen.
  6. Apply cut-out as a collage layer. Draw in repeating shapes and enhance with piercing.
  7. Consider other options for creating marks on the surface before you begin applying paint, collage or journaling.

 

~*~

Read About Michelle Ward in the May/June 2014 Issue of Somerset Studio

May/June 2014 Somerset StudioThank you Michelle Ward for the amazing tutorial! To read more about Michelle’s Debris Journals pick up a copy of the May/June 2014 issue of Somerset Studio.
 

To see more of Michelle’s work, and to see where she is teaching, visit her blog at: www.MichelleWard.typepad.com
 
To see her full line of rubber stamps, stencils, and stencil/mask sets,
visit her website: www.GreenPepperPress.com

 

 

Related Products:

Stencil Girl Quatrefoil Stencil by Michelle WardAdvantus Tim Holtz Idea-ology Small FolioRanger Ink Dina Wakley Media Mask - LeavesFaber-Castell - Mix and Match Pitt Artist Pen Set EssentialStencil Girl Maltese Stencil by Michelle Ward

 

Related Posts: