Shiva Paintstiks Portrait Tutorial by Guest Artist Pam Carriker

We are thrilled to have Pam Carriker here today to walk us through the process of creating an oil painting from start to finish.

It’s fun to create an “oil painting” using simple tools and Shiva Paintstiks for a non-messy alternative to traditional oil paints. If portraits aren’t your thing, try doing a simple still life “oil painting” using everyday objects around your home to spark some inspiration! Either way, these Shiva Paintstiks are great tools you can use to achieve the look of oil paints without all of the fuss.

Materials

Shiva Paintstiks in the following colors: Prussian Blue, Yellow Ochre, Alizarin Crimson, Antique White, Titanium White, Raw Umber and any background colors you like
Strathmore 400 Series Acrylic Paper, other acrylic paper, or heavy paper with a tooth to it
Blending tool – either a blending stump, rubber-tipped blending tool, Loew Cornell Berry Maker, or an equivalent
Oderless Mineral Spirits, if desired
Pencil
Stencil brush, or old scruffy brush
Sequin waste or other stencil type texture tool

NOTE: You will have to peel off the “skin” that forms on the crayons in between uses. Just grab the tip of the crayon with a paper towel and gently twist back and forth. The skin will peel off onto the paper towel and then you’re ready to go. You can use the crayons for direct applications or color a swatch onto a palette to pick up with a brush or other tool.

Instructions

Thanks for sharing this gorgeous technique, Pam! The Spring 2012 issue of Art Journaling features more of Pam’s painting techniques. Glimpse into Pam’s artful world by visiting her website at pamcarriker.com.
 

 
 

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Posted: Thursday, April 19th, 2012 @ 9:10 am
Categories: Guest Artist, How-To.
Tags: , .
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9 Responses to “Shiva Paintstiks Portrait Tutorial by Guest Artist Pam Carriker”

  1. Roxanne says:

    How wonderful….love the luminous look of this piece! thank you for taking the time to share this technique with us! Just beautiful!

  2. Maureen says:

    Wow, I just got these and really had no idea how to use them. This was a wonderful tutorial, I only wish it had been a video. Thanks so much for sharing it, the timing was great!

  3. What a nice blog, I´m so glad I found it … I really love this beautiful vintage style that is in the blog. So much inspiration! I do vintage backgrounds so this was really something I ♥ …..
    Many greetings from Sweden
    Linnea

  4. Cindy says:

    I loved this article. Makes me want to try it. I have some trouble coming up with a well painted face. This helps a lot! Thanks so much!

  5. Lovely portrait and tutorial. I have been wanting Shiva paintsticks…now I’m really inspired to get them and try this. Thanks!

  6. Tammie says:

    wonderful
    thank you so much for sharing how you made your beautiful piece

  7. Marvelous documentation. It touched a 74 old man’s heart.and I will show it to my 2 grandsons.

  8. Yellow page directory, business directory, directory, I need a company that can provide music entertainment on one of our events at work. I went to http://searchtheyellowpagess.com/ and saw that there are a lot of options for me.

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Gabriela Guest ArtistHow-To ,

We are thrilled to have Pam Carriker here today to walk us through the process of creating an oil painting from start to finish.

It’s fun to create an “oil painting” using simple tools and Shiva Paintstiks for a non-messy alternative to traditional oil paints. If portraits aren’t your thing, try doing a simple still life “oil painting” using everyday objects around your home to spark some inspiration! Either way, these Shiva Paintstiks are great tools you can use to achieve the look of oil paints without all of the fuss.

Materials

Shiva Paintstiks in the following colors: Prussian Blue, Yellow Ochre, Alizarin Crimson, Antique White, Titanium White, Raw Umber and any background colors you like
Strathmore 400 Series Acrylic Paper, other acrylic paper, or heavy paper with a tooth to it
Blending tool – either a blending stump, rubber-tipped blending tool, Loew Cornell Berry Maker, or an equivalent
Oderless Mineral Spirits, if desired
Pencil
Stencil brush, or old scruffy brush
Sequin waste or other stencil type texture tool

NOTE: You will have to peel off the “skin” that forms on the crayons in between uses. Just grab the tip of the crayon with a paper towel and gently twist back and forth. The skin will peel off onto the paper towel and then you’re ready to go. You can use the crayons for direct applications or color a swatch onto a palette to pick up with a brush or other tool.

Instructions

Thanks for sharing this gorgeous technique, Pam! The Spring 2012 issue of Art Journaling features more of Pam’s painting techniques. Glimpse into Pam’s artful world by visiting her website at pamcarriker.com.
 

 
 

Related Posts: